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Posts from the ‘Cats’ Category

The Remedy for Love

May 14, 2013

pieceablekingdom

May 15th is a great day to make a donation to honor someone you love.  It is Give Big Day, sponsored by the Seattle Foundation, when contributions to over 1400 organizations will be “stretched” through a matching pool.  I am making a donation to Purrfect Pals in memory of a very special cat.  Please join me by giving what you can in celebration of someone who has made a difference in your life:

http://www.seattlefoundation.org/npos/Pages/PurrfectPals.aspx

“There is no remedy for love but to love more.”  ~Henry David Thoreau

 Along with the joy of living with animals comes the inevitable heartbreak of losing them.  Our companions never live long enough, no matter how well we care for them.  And when they leave, there is a huge hole in our lives.  Sometimes it takes a long time to heal.

 A year ago today, I said goodbye to Possum, a gray cat who had been with me through the steep ups and downs of our fifteen years together.  I have loved many cats in my life, and like a good parent, I should not admit to having a favorite.  But I did, and getting over this loss remains an unfolding process.  I still reach for him in the early morning, and remember with a sharp pang that he is no longer here.

Poss was rescued by Friends of Campus Cats near the Mary Gates building at the University of Washington when he was just a few days old.  Sharon and Diana, the stalwarts of Campus Cats, managed to trap, spay/neuter, and release hundreds of cats at the U, but Possum’s mother eluded them until shortly after he and his siblings were born.  Three of them were strong and healthy, but Poss came close to dying several times.  He could not shake a tenacious case of coccidiosis, and by the time he was 4 months old, he had spent a frightening number of nights getting fluids at an emergency clinic.

People who have worked with animals know that ones who are gravely ill often develop an ethereal sweetness, and despite their weakness, are completely present.  Possum was like that.  I fell in love with him while I was volunteering with Campus Cats.  I didn’t intend to fall for a kitten with such limited chances, but how do we choose who captures our hearts?

And how can we predict who will survive, despite the odds?  By the time he was 6 months old, Possum was stronger.  Two months later, his devoted caregivers allowed me to adopt him.  I set up a room for him, and planned a thoughtful introduction to the other resident cats, one of whom could be a terrible bully.  In the middle of our first night together, I heard Poss crying.  When I opened the door to check on him, he slipped past me, ran right to the orange menace, and immediately disarmed him with a surprise head rub.  There was never an issue between the two of them, and over time, my gray boy proved to be quite the diplomat, always befriending new cats and facilitating easy introductions.

Possum in the window

Possum in the window

Possum was a gentle observer, quiet, and sometimes goofy as he did mid-air back flips in pursuit of raffia.  He was also the most arboreal cat I’ve known, leaping from the floor to the tops of doors where he perched for hours watching the world below him.  I thought about writing and illustrating a picture book that would begin with the line, “My cat Possum thinks he is a lemur.”  It would portray him as the many animals he was: prairie dog, greyhound, bushtit, and in his later ground-bound life, turtle and toad.  The last illustration would explain why he was named Possum: as a puny kitten, he squeezed between his much larger siblings at the bowl, with only his long , skinny tail visible.  His rescuers thought he looked like his namesake.

 That little runt grew into a gorgeous cat, long and lithe, with a velvet coat and almost comically small ears.  A veterinarian once asked me if he knew how handsome he was.  I responded that no, he was quite unaware.  She said that he was lucky because self-conscious beauty in any being could be a burden. 

Possum and I lived through many losses together, and each of them brought me to a deeper understanding of unqualified love.  I could be a sobbing mess, and he never left my side.  He was a cheerful morning animal, and I started every day cuddling with him, rubbing his belly as he purred deeply.  I miss those moments the most.

Early last spring, something was clearly wrong.  Exams and blood work could not explain Possum’s increasing weakness and confusion.  When we realized he had suddenly gone blind, we suspected a brain tumor, but chose not to put him through extensive diagnostic testing.  It all happened so fast, and when he could no longer hold up his head, we decided it was time to schedule euthanasia.

I have said goodbye to more cats than I can count, and it is never, ever easy.  Before they die, I think of those cats who have gone before, and I ask them to help the others cross over.  Before Possum died, I could not even conjure the images of his predecessors.  Their world on the other side of mine was silent, closed.  I felt empty, and somewhat panicked.  I needed their help to ease this transition for Possum, and for myself.

Bengal Tiger

Bengal Tiger in paper collage

The night before our scheduled appointment, I slept on the couch to be closer to Poss in his basket.  He did not even seem to know I was there.  Just before dawn, in the liminal space between dreaming and waking, I sensed a large feline presence next to me. It was a tiger, a healthy young male.  I asked him for help, and he responded that if I could hold Possum close to me while I followed him into the darkness, he would make sure my gray cat passed safely.  When I finally woke in the light of mid-May, I lifted Possum into my arms, and we began our last few hours together.  I assured him that he would be alright, and I almost believed it.

 I can’t deny that it was a rough passage.  My gentle cat, unable to move when I carried him out of our house, surged with energy and fought until his big heart was finally still.  A friend suggested to me that it was tiger energy, that he had begun his journey into the unknown with a roar.  A few months later, I began a series of portraits with the image of a Bengal tiger.  Then, I created Possum, and finally the two of them together, Poss glancing over his shoulder at me one last time.  It is the strongest artwork I have ever done.  It was the beginning of my own passage into a new chapter of life.

A year later, I have vivid images of not one, but two cats to remind me to be both gentle and strong, and to love fiercely.  And I think of my favorite Thoreau quote.  It is a homeopathic remedy: treat love lost by loving even more. 

Possum and his tiger

Possum and his tiger

Shortly after Possum died, I sent a donation to Friends of Campus Cats to thank them for bringing the best cat ever into my life.  Today, I am making a contribution to Purrfect Pals.  I am paying forward in gratitude for a cat I have not yet met who will fill my life with joy.  I will never replace Possum,  but there is too much love in this heart not to share it.

A Tale of Two Mothers

May 10, 2013

pieceablekingdom

One cat just leads to another.  ~Ernest Hemingway

Yes, it is ironic to start a Mother’s Day blog with a quote from Ernest Hemingway.  I am sure many people referred to Papa as a “mother” during his life, and he most likely deserved it.  He was a troubled, tough guy, with a big soft spot in his heart for cats.  A friend recently returned from the Florida Keys with stories about Hemingway’s house, now a museum, and home to over 40 cats, descendants of Snowball, the polydactyl kitten given to the author by a sea captain over 80 years ago.  Without me even having to ask the question, my friend explained that there was a spay/neuter program in place.  Females have one litter, are then spayed, and the original line continues.

Since that conversation, I’ve thought about how many cats a single, unspayed female produces.  A look online yielded some wild numbers, up to 400,000 if all her offpring are also reproductive.   Snopes  debunked that total, citing a feral cat colony study done by the University of Washington’s Math Department:
Cat reproduction graphic“Here are the assumptions used for the population projection: One female cat gives birth to six kittens per year. Kitten gender is 50 percent female, and only 25 percent of kittens survive to reproductive age. All surviving female kittens become adults and reproduce with the same birth and kitten mortality rates. If no adult cats ever die, how many cats/kittens would there be at the end of seven years? One female cat and her offspring could produce between 100 and 400 cats by the end of seven years.”  

Given that cats can have multiple litters in a year, the estimate seems low, but still a nightmarish statistic for those contending with overpopulation.  Cats can become pregnant at a mere 6 months, when they are still kittens themselves, which is why progressive shelters spay and neuter as early as 2 months of age.  If they are not already strays, many pregnant cats are turned out of their homes because people don’t want to deal with kittens.  Not that long ago, humans did the same thing to our own.  Every town has old buildings that were euphemistically called” homes for unwed mothers,” and in some places in the world, pregnant women still deliver their children in exile from their communities.

If a feline mother is lucky, she is taken in by concerned people who either foster or find a rescue organization to care for the cat and her kittens until they can be adopted.  In my last post, I wrote about the opportunity that Purrfect Pals and Foster Dad John Bartlett have given us through the Kitten Cam.  In the comfort of our own homes, we can watch a mother cat and her kittens, knowing that their stories will end happily when they all find their forever homes.

And now, the stories of 2 cats I want to honor this Mother’s Day.  The first is rather famous.  Named for the Sigourney Weaver character in Alien, Ripley is a slim and elegant cat.  Found as a stray and taken to a shelter, she ended up at Purrfect Pals, where she gave birth to 5 kittens.

Ripley in paper

Ripley’s portrait in paper collage

In John’s words, “Ripley doted on her kittens constantly when they were newborns, always providing them with a warm belly to feel safe with and to nurse. Her fans remember her fondly for her trademarked wide-eyed look every time she heard any kind of noise that couldn’t be 100% identified.”  Ripley won the hearts of thousands of Kitten Cam viewers, and we held our collective breath on adoption day as her kittens left one by one, and Ripley patiently waited.

The wait was worth it.  In the afternoon, John posted a message to tell us someone was on the way to save the day, and later, he shared a picture captioned “Ripley with her gentleman.”  As it turns out, Ripley has a whole family, with 2 loving people, and 2 other cats who have accepted her into the fold.

Ripley shares her quilt with cat sister Lilly

Ripley shares her quilt with cat sister Lilly

And onto the quilt I made her.  Ripley will represent the Kitten Cam mamas in the 13 Cats Project, and indeed, her story is a fairytale, from the lonely streets to a loving home.

Another mother who will be featured in the project still awaits her forever home.  Glorianne is a Himalayan, recently rescued from a breeding facility where she had been regularly bred for a decade.  That means Glori had at least 10 kittens a year, probably close to one hundred before she was finally spayed by Purrfect Pals.   She was surrendered along with 2 breeding males, Gordon and Gunther, who are about her age.  All of them spent their lives in individual cages, handled only when they were bred, but otherwise lacking any interaction with people or other cats.  Without  proper socialization, and in poor condition when they arrived at the shelter, their adoption prospects looked bleak.

Glori and Gunther

Glori and Gunther on their quilts

Enter Purrfect Pals, and their relentless belief in every cat in their care.  Glori, Gordon, and Gunther spent the next few months pampered by foster mother extraordinaire Connie Gabelein, Executive Director at Purrfect Pals. Connie  lured the three Gs out of hiding with countless cans of smelly food.  She slowly gained their trust, and they became more confident.   Last weekend, they were introduced to the world at the Average Joe Cat Show, and are now available for adoption at the Issaquah Petco.  All three have their quilts already, each stitched from William Morris reproduction fabrics in different color schemes.  I figured that if ever a group of cats deserved dignified quilts, it was the Gs.  As soon as they find their forever people, I will do their portraits, and finish writing their stories.

So, back to the Hemingway quote.  I admit to using it a bit out of context.  Papa didn’t intentionally refer to cat reproduction, although he was surrounded by unspayed females, one generation leading right into the next.  My interpretation of his words is this: when cat lovers invite one feline into our hearts and homes, there is inevitably room for more.  Ripley’s family found that open space.  It is my fervent hope that Glorianne, Gordon, and Gunther find their people soon.  Even more than that, I hope that everyone will realize the importance of adopting from rescue groups and shelters, and that in time, no other cats will be bred for profit.  On this Mother’s Day, let’s make a special place for all the mama cats like Glori who richly deserve a loving home.

Glori, ready for her forever home

Glori, ready for her forever home

How I learned to stop worrying and love kittens

April 19, 2013

pieceablekingdom

That’s right . . . I haven’t always loved kittens.  In fact, my time working at an animal shelter taught me to dread them.  Kitten seasons, especially the ones that started early and ended late, were bad news for us, and even worse news for the adult cats surrendered to the shelter.  Older cats, sometimes even those barely out of adolescence, just couldn’t compete.  Adopters were drawn to the cute little ones while the others, as we euphemistically said, ran out of time.

In doing humane education, I heard people ask why they couldn’t let their cat have just one litter before she was spayed.  Parents really wanted their children to experience the miracle of birth, and the fun of watching kittens grow up.  On particularly difficult days during peak kitten season, I had to stop myself from saying, “Why don’t you meet me at the shelter this evening so we can share the miracle of death.”  Instead, I explained the problems of overpopulation in the most helpful words I could find.  And I encouraged parents to turn on the Nature Channel more often.

As happens in that line of work, I relied on some interesting coping skills.  One of them was shutting kittens out altogether.  I knew they would be adopted, and that they would get plenty of attention from others at the shelter.  So, I focused on the adults, doubling my efforts to get their stories into the world.  Twice a month, I took older cats to a local TV station for a Saturday morning pet feature.  I touted the benefits of adopting “experienced” cats, ones who would not required kitten-proofing a house.  Usually, there was someone waiting to meet the new star when I returned to the shelter, but not always.  Kitten season was hell.

When a friend sent me the link to the Kitten Cam last year, I initially resisted.  And yes, I judged.  Purrfect Pals volunteer John Bartlett has fostered 37 litters of kittens, the last several of them on camera.  At the time I tuned in, the Scientist Kittens were in residence, still tiny things with their thin, patient mother, almost a kitten herself.  I watched for a few minutes, felt my blood pressure elevate, and walked away from the computer.  John seemed like a nice, sensible man, and I knew Purrfect Pals to be a solid organization, fully committed to helping cats in all circumstances.  Why then, I wondered, had they colluded to promote kittens?  How in the world could I condone this blatant irresponsibility by watching even casually?

I had a lot of thawing to do, and the last several months have brought a big and welcome melt.  I started watching the kittens in the evening after work, and before long I left the livestream running on my computer while I worked.  I got hooked, and, oh my gods, realized how much fun it is to watch kittens open their eyes, learn to walk, and tussle with each other right up to adoption day.   With my early warning system completely disabled, I suddenly understood why parents would want their kids to watch this.

And the best thing is, they can.  John and Purrfect Pals are brilliant.  People of all ages can get involved – and involvement is what happens – and it is even better than having to clean up after a litter in your own home.  Plus, it is obvious how many resources go into raising kittens.  Watch John, admittedly a model foster parent, and you’ll see how much time, energy, and money it takes to do this right.  People inclined to let their cat have that one batch of kittens should witness the entire process on the Kitten Cam.

So, learning to love kittens is changing my life.  For the first time in years, I feel energized about rescue work, and understand it can be a very different experience than what I knew in the past.  In addition to the connections many of us have made through the Kitten Cam, we regularly celebrate the creativity of people who have fallen under its spell.  These cats inspire their fans to be creative.  From making wonderful videos and needle-felting tiny kittens,  drawing pencil portraits and setting up a Café Press shop, people engage with their hearts and hands.  This is the future of rescue work.  It is truly an act of love.  And yes, it is fun!

Science Family Portrait

Science Family Portrait

Watching the Scientist family last year, I remembered how much I wanted to create a book about rescued cats.  I couldn’t even begin to do it until I let myself fall in love with kittens.  It was appropriate that my first reconnection was a paper collage portrait of Ellie Marie and her family.  I am happy to say that I am moving forward with the book project, and have just finished a portrait of sweet Penny (earlier known as Newt), one of Ripley’s kittens.  She is the first of 13 Purrfect Pals cats who will receive a quilt and have her story told in collage and words.

Here’s to kitten power.  Oh yes, keep spreading the word: don’t wait to have your cat spayed!